Regions, ruins and regeneration focuses on issues of identity, community and place as they relate to theatre and performance. Neil Murray and Graham McLaren, currently joint artistic directors of the Abbey Theatre, noted on their 2015 appointment:

We believe in the concept of a national theatre that reaches all of the country. This applies to touring work, but also addresses the issue of where shows and projects are rooted and made, regardless of geographical remoteness or perceived social barriers

Both directors were instrumental in the development of the National Theatre of Scotland: a ‘theatre without walls,’ committed to sharing the stories of different Scottish communities. In 2016, the NTS converted an old steel warehouse into its headquarters, calling it Rockvilla after the former name of its canal-side location in Glasgow – a district title that faded from maps as the industries that characterised the area gradually disappeared.

Within both contemporary and historical theatre and performance contexts, moves toward cultural regeneration are entangled with a range of geopolitical and socioeconomic factors – most keenly felt in regeneration projects that displace established local communities and customs. In Europe, efforts to redress a metropolitanism that positions capital cities at the pinnacle of national cultural capital coalesced in the latter half of the twentieth century, reinforced by EU cultural policies such as the establishment of the European Capital of Culture in 1985. More recently, the Arts Council of England has sought to redress funding imbalances by boosting its funding for regional practices. With these ideas, and the looming shadow of the United Kingdom's prospective withdrawal from the European Union as a backdrop, this year's conference presents papers that critically encounter: borders and boundaries; boroughs and districts; national and regional identities; migration; urban and rural ruins; gentrification and the neoliberal; arts funding and cultural policy; recession, recovery, environments, ecology and migration.

BOOK LAUNCHES

books we are proud to be launching at istr

Rape on the Contemporary Stage by Lisa Fitzpatrick

Christoph Schlingensief: Staging Chaos, Performing Politics and Theatrical Phantasmagoria by Anna Scheer

Dance Matters in Ireland: Contemporary Performance and Practice edited by Aoife McGrath and Emma Meehan

Performance Ireland: Gender, Sexuality, and the City edited by Shonagh Hill and Cormac O’Brien

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KEYNOTE SPEAKER

 

 

 

Friday 1 June

Mike Pearson, Aberystwyth University

‘“The Country and the City”: performing places'

 

 

 

 

 

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KEYNOTE SPEAKER

 

Saturday 2 June

Charlotte McIvor, NUI Galway

‘Moving from Efficacy towards Effort: Notes on Renovating Performance Theory for This Political Present’

 

 

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TaPRA Panel: Stages of Inclusion II

Alison Jeffers (University of Manchester), Jane Turner (Manchester Metropolitan University), & Marilena Zaroulia (University of Winchester)

ISTR prides itself on creating warm, welcoming and intellectually-stimulating forums for researchers and practitioners to discuss key issues in theatre and performance (from within and beyond Ireland) relating to historical and contemporary times. For more than a decade, this organisation has valued culturally diverse perspectives, promoted critical generosity, and resisted perceptions of intellectual superiority in discussions and feedback. While maintaining high standards in the quality of material included across our different forums, we seek to support contributors at all professional levels and are open always to including new additions within our community.
— our ethos

Welcome to Lincoln

 

The Lincoln School of Fine and Performing arts at the University of Lincoln is delighted to welcome you to our city for the 2018 ISTR annual conference. Situated on the side of Lincoln's Brayford Pool, our city centre campus is a short walk from the contemporary and historical heart of Lincoln. Accommodation, places to eat, drink and socialise are all within walking distance, and we hope you'll find the time to explore our beautiful city while you're with us.

 
  Lincoln Performing Arts Centre (LPAC)   The LPAC is our main home in the University, and where we teach our Drama & Theatre, and Dance programmes. All of our sessions, as well as keynotes, book launches and wine receptions, will all take place in this building. It's easily found on campus (it's exactly opposite the library and next to the Student's Union) and local taxi companies will be able to bring you direct to our door. 

Lincoln Performing Arts Centre (LPAC)

The LPAC is our main home in the University, and where we teach our Drama & Theatre, and Dance programmes. All of our sessions, as well as keynotes, book launches and wine receptions, will all take place in this building. It's easily found on campus (it's exactly opposite the library and next to the Student's Union) and local taxi companies will be able to bring you direct to our door. 

  Historic Lincoln   Conquered by the Romans in 48AD, and with settlements dating as far back as the Iron Age, Lincoln boasts a rich history. Its 11th Century cathedral dominates the cityscape, and is visible atop the hill from almost any location. If you want some recommendations of things to do or places to visit while you're here, just ask!

Historic Lincoln

Conquered by the Romans in 48AD, and with settlements dating as far back as the Iron Age, Lincoln boasts a rich history. Its 11th Century cathedral dominates the cityscape, and is visible atop the hill from almost any location. If you want some recommendations of things to do or places to visit while you're here, just ask!

 LSFPA Students perform  More Than a Statistic    at Lincoln Cathedral, as part of the 2018 Site Specific Performance module. Photo:Phil Crow

LSFPA Students perform More Than a Statistic at Lincoln Cathedral, as part of the 2018 Site Specific Performance module. Photo:Phil Crow

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Siobhan O'Gorman

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Anna Scheer

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Andrew Westerside

Our thanks to:

Dr Karen Savage
Head of School, LSFPA

Prof. Dominic Symonds
Director of Research, LSFPA

Dr Craig Morrow
Artistic Director, Lincoln Performing Arts Centre

Holly Cox
Front of House Manager, Lincoln Performing Arts Centre

Rosalyn Casbard
Senior Administrator, LSFPA

Prof. Ananda Breed
Professor in Theatre, LSFPA

Dr Kelly Jones
Senior Lecturer, LSFPA

Dr James Hudson
Senior Lecturer, LSFPA

Dr Aylwyn Walsh
Senior Lecturer, PCI (Leeds)

Dr Sree Nair
Senior Lecturer, LSFPA

Rachel Baynton
Lecturer/Creative Engagement Producer, LSFPA

Conan Lawrence
Deputy Head of School, LSFPA

Dr Michael Pinchbeck
Principal Lecturer, LSFPA

Dr Jacqueline Bolton
Senior Lecturer, LSFPA

Prof. Eric Weitz
ISTR President

Dr Marie Kelly
ISTR Vice-President

Prof. Dan Rebeallato
TaPRA Conference Officer

Thomas Marcinek
Technician, Lincoln Performing Arts Centre

& finally

The ISTR Executive Committee Board

Dr Chris Collins, Dr Lisa Fitzpatrick, Dr Miriam Haughton, Dr Eamonn Jordan, Dr Aoife McGrath, Dr Siobhan O’Gorman, Dr Ondrej Pilny, Dr Melissa Sihra, Dr Rhona Trench, Dr Ian Walsh